International Space Station: Live updates


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2021-12-21T10:34:06.821Z
Dragon CRS-24 successfully in orbit

SpaceX’s Dragon CRS-24 cargo ship has successfully opened its nose cone to uncover its docking port, the final step in today’s launch toward the International Space Station. Read our recap of the predawn liftoff.

The spacecraft, which has visited the space station before, is scheduled to dock at the orbiting laboratory on Wednesday, Dec. 22, at 4:30 a.m. EST (0930 GMT)

NASA will provide live coverage of the Dragon spacecraft’s autonomous docking, beginning at 3 a.m. EST (0800 GMT). You can watch that docking live on this page via the NASA TV feed at the top of this page.

2021-12-21T10:22:55.857Z
Touchdown! SpaceX rocket lands as Dragon reaches orbit

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket stands atop the drone landing ship Just Read The Instructions after a successful landing following the launch of the CRS-24 Dragon cargo ship for NASA from Pad 39A of the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Dec. 21, 2021. (Image credit: SpaceX)

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 1st stage has landed successfully after launching Dragon CRS-24 cargo mission for NASA. That’s landing no. 100 for SpaceX.

Meanwhile, the Dragon CRS-24 cargo ship has reached orbit and separated from its Falcon 9 upper stage. Nose cone deployment is expected soon.

2021-12-21T10:12:46.597Z
Stage Separation for Falcon 9 rocket

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket first stage has separated from its upper stage and is beginning its return to Earth for a landing on the drone ship Just Read The Instructions in the Atlantic Ocean.

The upper stage carrying the Dragon CRS-24 cargo ship is continuing its ascent to orbit.

2021-12-21T10:07:56.007Z
LIFTOFF! SpaceX launches Dragon CRS-24

LIFTOFF! SpaceX launches a new Falcon 9 rocket carrying the Dragon CRS-24 cargo ship for NASA. Next stop, International Space Station.

2021-12-21T10:03:38.479Z
T-5 minutes to launch

SpaceX’s CRS-24 Dragon cargo mission is 5 minutes from launch and the weather looks like it may clear in time for today’s launch, SpaceX reports. 

Fueling is underway for the Falcon 9 rocket and should be completed about 2 minutes before liftoff. 

2021-12-21T09:48:26.436Z
SpaceX CRS-24 launch webcast begins

SpaceX’s launch webcast for today’s CRS-24 Dragon cargo resupply mission has begun. You can watch it live in the window above or directly from NASA here and from SpaceX. Liftoff is now targeted for 5:07 a.m. EST (1007 GMT), a minute later than earlier announced.

The weather forecast is dismal for today’s launch attempt, with just a 30% of good weather at NASA’s Pad 39A for today’s launch. 

2021-12-21T09:34:16.186Z
SpaceX to launch NASA CRS-24 cargo mission

A new SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and a previously flown Cargo Dragon spacecraft stand atop Pad 39B of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida ahead of a planned Dec. 21, 2021 launch to the International Space Station. (Image credit: SpaceX)

SpaceX is counting down to launch a new Falcon 9 rocket carrying the CRS-24 cargo mission to the International Space Station for NASA today (Dec. 21) and you can watch it live at the top of this page. Liftoff is at 5:06 a.m. EST (1006 GMT)

NASA and SpaceX will begin webcasting today’s launch at 4:45 a.m. EST (0945 GMT)

SpaceX is using a rare new Falcon 9 rocket for today’s launch. Its Cargo Dragon spacecraft previously flew to the space station. The mission will deliver about  6,500 pounds of supplies and experiment gear to the International Space Station for its Expedition 66 crew. 

2021-12-20T16:47:03.494Z
NASA, SpaceX press briefing today on CRS-24 cargo aunch

NASA and SpaceX are counting down to launch a new cargo ship to the International Space Station on Tuesday, Dec. 21, and will hold a prelaunch press conference today at 12 p.m. EST (1700 GMT). You can watch the prelaunch briefing live on this page, courtesy of NASA, in the window above.

The weather forecast is currently dismal, with only a 30% chance of good launch conditions. 

2021-12-20T04:31:29.827Z
Soyuz MS-20 crew is safe on Earth

Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa, his videographer Yozo Hirano and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin have exited the Soyuz capsule and are headed to the Karaganda airport to begin their journeys home.

After a 12-day spaceflight, the trio touched down at about 10:13 p.m. EST (0313 GMT or 9:13 a.m. local time on Dec. 20) on the steppe of Kazakhstan, southeast of the town of Dzhezkazgan.

You can see video of the crew emerging from the Soyuz capsule above, and read our full story about today’s Soyuz landing here

2021-12-20T03:56:50.943Z
1st view of the Soyuz!

NASA TV finally has live video footage from the landing site. Here is the first view of the charred Soyuz MS-20 spacecraft that landed today!

(Image credit: NASA TV)

2021-12-20T03:43:22.872Z
Recovery crew is on site

The crew is reportedly safe and in good health as search and recovery teams are helping them out of the capsule. 

The Soyuz landed upright and did not tip over after the impact, which could help speed up the recovery process. 

2021-12-20T03:34:25.979Z
Roscosmos confirms Soyuz landing

The Soyuz MS-20 has successfully touched down, Dmitry Rogozin, director general of Russia’s space agency Roscosmos, announced on Twitter

NASA TV commentator Brandi Dean said that bad weather in Kazakhstan has somewhat hindered the recovery effort, but there is “no reason to suspect that anything is wrong.” 

Recovery teams “had visuals of the Soyuz descending under parachutes, but because of the visibility issues with the weather there at the landing site [they] did not see the actual touchdown,” Dean said. “So they’re working on getting to the Soyuz at this point and we are standing by for confirmation that they are there with the crew.”

2021-12-20T03:17:06.228Z
Touchdown?

The Soyuz MS-20 spacecraft should have touched down on time at 10:13 p.m. EST (0313 GMT), but NASA and Roscosmos have not yet confirmed the landing, and we’re still waiting on the first video footage from the landing site. There are no indications that anything went wrong with the landing, according to NASA TV commentator Brandi Dean. 

2021-12-20T02:25:05.363Z
Deorbit burn complete

The Soyuz MS-20 has successfully completed a deorbit burn after firing its engines for 4 minutes and 39 seconds. The spacecraft is on track for an on-time landing in Kazakhstan at 10:13 p.m. EST (0313 GMT).

2021-12-19T23:54:52.068Z
The Soyuz is on its way to Earth

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A view of the Soyuz MS-20 spacecraft departing the International Space Station on Dec. 19, 2021. (Image credit: NASA TV)

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A view of the Soyuz MS-20 spacecraft departing the International Space Station on Dec. 19, 2021. (Image credit: NASA TV)

The Soyuz MS-20 spacecraft successfully separated from the International Space Station at 6:50 p.m. EST (2350 GMT) and is now on its way to Earth with Maezawa, Hirano and Misurkin on board. The space station was orbiting 263 miles (423) kilometers above Mongolia at the time of undocking. 

NASA TV’s live coverage of their return to Earth will resume at 9 p.m. EST (0200 GMT), 18 minutes before the planned deorbit burn. After the deorbit burn, the Soyuz spacecraft will spend just under an hour descending to Earth. The crew is expected to touch down in Kazakhstan at 10:13 p.m. EST (0313 GMT).

2021-12-19T23:37:20.155Z
NASA TV’s undocking coverage has begun

Alexander Misurkin, Yusaku Maezawa and Yozo Hirano are inside the Soyuz MS-20 spacecraft and preparing for an on-time departure from the International Space Station. The Soyuz MS-20 spacecraft is scheduled to undock at 6:50 p.m. EST (2350 GMT) and land in Kazakhstan at 10:13 p.m. EST (0313 Dec. 20 GMT). You can watch it live now in the window above. Read more

2021-12-19T14:26:21.267Z
Landing day for Japanese space tourists

Billionaire entrepreneur Yusaku Maezawa (left), cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (center) and video producer Yozo Hirano (right) are scheduled to launch toward the International Space Station on Dec. 8, 2021. Hirano will participate in health-related research during and after the mission. (Image credit: CPK/Roscosmos)

It’s landing day for Japanese billionaire space tourist Yusaku Maezawa, his video producer Yozo Hirano and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin.

The trio will return to Earth tonight, Dec. 19, in their Soyuz spacecraft with a landing on the steppes of Kazakhstan scheduled for 10:18 p.m. EST (0318 GMT on Dec. 20). You can watch it live on this page in the NASA TV video feed at the top. 

NASA will broadcast several events today leading up to tonight’s landing. Here’s a schedule to plan your afternoon and evening:

3 p.m. EST / 2000 GMT — NASA TV coverage begins for hatch closing at 3:32 p.m. EST (2032 GMT)6:30 p.m. EST / 2300 GMT — NASA TV coverage begins for undocking at 6:54 p.m. EST (2354 GMT)9 p.m. EST / 0200 GMT Dec. 20 — NASA TV coverage begins for deorbit and landing. Landing is targeted for 10:18 p.m. EST / 0318 GMT Dec. 20.

Maezawa, Hirano and Misurkin launched to the space station on Dec. 8 on a mission brokered for Maezawa by the U.S. space tourism company Space Adventures. Maezawa is financing the entire trip for an undisclosed sum, though past tourist flights to the station have cost more up to $35 million for one person based on reports from Cirque du Soliel founder Guy Laliberte’s flight in 2009. Maezawa has paid for two people, suggesting an even higher fee. 

Maezawa and Hirano have spent their time in space recording videos of Maezawa showcasing the spaceflight experience. They also delivered the first Uber Eats meal in space and Hirano is participating in some medical experiments to study the effects of spaceflight on the human body.

Watch NASA TV tonight to see the trio return to Earth.

2021-12-10T14:41:44.347Z
Postcard from the space station

Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa has figured out how to float. Two days into his stay aboard the International Space Station, Maezawa on Twitter shared an image of him seated cross-legged and waving at the camera with the caption, “Hi from space.” 

2021-12-08T16:49:26.057Z
Japanese billionaire

Japanese entrepreneur Yusaku Maezawa enters the International Space Station to begin a 12-day space tourist trip following a Soyuz launch and docking on Dec. 8, 2021. (Image credit: NASA TV)

Japanese space tourists Yusakuy Maezawa and Yozo Hirano have begun their 12-day stay aboard the International Space Station after entering the orbiting laboratory at 11:11 a.m. EST (1611 GMT) with veteran Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin. 

The two space tourists, whose flight was arranged by the Virginia-based company Space Adventures with Russia’s space agency Roscosmos, are due to return to Earth on Dec. 19 at 9 p.m. EST (0200 GMT Dec. 20) on the remote steppes of Kazakhstan.

2021-12-08T15:37:23.642Z
Japanese space tourists, cosmonaut to enter ISS

A view of the Soyuz MS-20 capsule flying near the International Space Station before docking on Dec. 8, 2021. (Image credit: NASA TV)

Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa, video producer Yozo Hirano and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin have climbed out of their Sokol launch pressure suits and are preparing to enter the International Space Station after their successful docking earlier today. The Soyuz MS-20 crew are conducting final leak checks between their Soyuz and the space station before opening the hatches between their two spacecraft. 

NASA is broadcasting live views of today’s hatch opening ceremony, which you can watch in the video feed at the top of this page.

2021-12-08T14:09:08.815Z
Docking complete!

The Soyuz capsule carrying Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa, his video producer Yozo Hirano and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin docked to the International Space Station at 8:40 a.m. EST (1340 GMT) after four orbits around Earth and about six hours after launch. Read the full story.

The trio are scheduled to enter the space station at about 10:35 a.m. EST (1535 GMT), with a live webcast beginning about 20 minutes prior.

2021-12-08T12:16:59.106Z
Watch Japanese space tourists dock at space station

Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa and his video producer Yozo Hirano will dock at the International Space Station today at 8:41 a.m. EST (1341 GMT) with Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin and you can watch it live here. The live webcast will begin at 8 a.m. EST (1300 GMT) from NASA. 

Maezawa and his crewmates launched to the space station early Wednesday and will spend 12 days on the space station. Maezawa bought the flight with Space Adventures, which has arranged several space tourism flights to the International Space Station with Russia’s Roscosmos space agency. 

Maezawa, Hirano and Misurkin are scheduled to enter the space station at 10:35 a.m. EST (1535 GMT). A hatch opening ceremony webcast will begin at 10:15 a.m. EST (1515 GMT).

2021-12-08T08:15:46.153Z
Billionaire Yusaku Maezawa, two others launch toward space station

Billionaire Japanese entrepreneur Yusaku Maezawa and his two crewmates are on their way to the International Space Station.

A Russian Soyuz spacecraft carrying Maezawa, fellow space tourist Yozo Hirano and cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin launched atop a Soyuz rocket from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan Wednesday (Dec. 8) at 2:38 a.m. EST (0738 GMT). [Full story.]

The trio is expected to arrive at the space station around 8:41 a.m. EST (1341 GMT) on Wednesday. The spaceflyers will remain in orbit for nearly 12 days, returning to Earth on Dec. 19.

2021-12-07T23:44:28.563Z
Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa launching to space station early Wednesday

Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa and two crewmates will launch toward the International Space Station early Wednesday morning (Dec. 8), and you can watch the action live.

A Russian Soyuz spacecraft carrying Maezawa, video producer Yozo Hirano and cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin is scheduled to lift off from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan Wednesday at 2:38 a.m. EST (0738 GMT). Watch it live at Space.com’s homepage courtesy of NASA, or directly via the space agency.

Maezawa paid for his seat and that of Hirano, who will document the mission. Their flight was organized by Virginia company Space Adventures, which has sent eight other people on seven trips to the orbiting lab over the years.

2021-11-29T16:27:33.738Z
Get ready for tomorrow’s spacewalk!

At 2 p.m. EDT (1900 GMT) today (Nov. 29), NASA will be hosting a news conference detailing what they expect to happen during tomorrow’s upcoming spacewalk.

The news conference will include three experts who will discuss the spacewalk and answer questions with a Q&A. Those experts include Dana Weigel, NASA’s deputy manager of the International Space Station Program, Vincent LaCourt, NASA’s spacewalk flight director and Art Thomason, NASA’s spacewalk officer. 

Check out the NASA TV live video above to catch the press conference.

The spacewalk being discussed will see NASA astronauts Thomas Marshburn and Kayla Barron, who recently arrived at the orbiting lab aboard SpaceX’s Crew-3 mission. They will exit the station’s Quest airlock around 7:10 a.m. EDT (1210 GMT) tomorrow (Nov. 30) to replace a faulty antenna system. Live coverage for the spacewalk itself is set to begin at 5:30 a.m. EDT (1030 GMT). 

2021-10-30T01:35:06.689Z
DOCKING! Progress 79 at space station

The uncrewed Progress 79 cargo ship approaches the International Space Station’s Zvezda service module during docking operations in orbit on Oct. 29, 2021. (Image credit: NASA TV)

Progress 79 has successfully docked at the International Space Station, linking up with the orbiting lab’s Russian-built Zvezda service module at 9:31 p.m. EDT (0131 GMT) as the two ships sailed 258 miles over Argentina, just south of Buenos Aires. 

“It doesn’t get much smoother than that,” NASA spokesperson Rob Navias said of the docking during live commentary. “A flawless ride from the launch pad at Baikonur to docking at the International Space Station.”

That will wrap our coverage of Roscosmos’ Progress 79 cargo ship docking at the International Space Station. Stay tuned for more updates from the station as they come up!

2021-10-30T01:22:56.285Z
Progress 79 on final approach to ISS

The Progress 79 cargo ship is now on final approach to its docking port at the Zvezda service module of the International Space Station. 

The berth is at the aft end of the station’s Russian segment. 

2021-10-30T01:12:16.498Z
Progress 79 flyaround underway

Progress 79 is now flying around the International Space Station to reach a point about 150 meters from the station’s Russian-built Zvezda service module, its destination for today’s cargo delivery. 

Docking still set for 9:34 pm EDT (0134 GMT). 

2021-10-30T01:08:17.765Z
Progress 79 in sight of space station

The Russian cargo ship Progress 79 is visible in this video still from a camera on the International Space Station during its docking approach on Oct. 29, 2021.  (Image credit: NASA TV)

Progress 79 is now less than 1 kilometers from the International Space Station as it nears the space station. Cameras on the station are showing stunning views of the approaching spacecraft.

Today’s docking approach is on track with no issues. 

(Image credit: NASA TV)

2021-10-30T00:49:37.576Z
NASA livestream underway for Progress 79 docking

NASA’s webcast for tonight’s Progress 79 cargo ship docking at the International Space Station has begin. 

The Russian built Progress 79 cargo ship will dock at the Zvezda service module on the space station at 9:34 p.m. EDT (0134 GMT). The spacecraft is carrying more than 5,600 pounds of supplies and gear — 2.8 tons in all —  for the station’s seven-astronaut crew. 

You can watch the docking live above at the top of this page. 

Progress 79 is currently about 7 kilometers away from the space station as it approaches  a flyaround point to reach its docking port.  

2021-10-29T18:51:06.222Z
Progress 79 cargo ship to dock tonight

The uncrewed Russian cargo ship Progress 79, which launched into orbit late Wednesday (Oct. 27), is due to dock at the International Space Station tonight and you can watch it live here. 

Progress 79, which is hauling nearly 3 tons of food, clothing, propellant and other supplies, will link up to the station’s Russian-built Zvezda service module at 9:34 p.m. EDT (0134 GMT). NASA’s live webcast of the rendezvous will begin at 8:45 p.m. EDT (0045 GMT)

You can watch the events live in the window at the top of this page. At 10 p.m. EDT (0200 GMT), NASA and SpaceX will also conduct a launch readiness review press conference for the Crew-3 SpaceX astronaut mission, due to launch on Oct. 31. 

2021-10-28T01:04:40.906Z
Progress 79 launches to space station

A Russian Soyuz 2.1a rocket carrying the uncrewed Progress 79 cargo ship launches into orbit from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan in the pre-dawn hours of Oct. 28, 2021 (late Oct. 27 EDT).  (Image credit: Glavkosmos/Roscosmos)

Russia’s space agency Roscosmos successfully launched the Progress 79 cargo ship to the International Space Station tonight at 8 p.m. EDT (0000 GMT) from Pad 6 of Site 31 at Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. It was 5 a.m. local time at the launch site. 

NASA spokesman Rob Navias said during live commentary that the Soyuz 2.1a rocket’s liftoff was a “perfect launch.”

The Progress 79 cargo ship is now making its uncrewed flight to the station, where it will dock late Friday night at the aft end of the station’s Russian-built Zvezda service module. 

Docking is set for 9:34 p.m. EDT, Friday, Oct. 29 (0134 GMT Saturday, Oct. 30).

2021-10-27T23:41:17.312Z
Russian Progress 79 cargo ship ready to launch

(Image credit: RSC Energia)

A Russian Soyuz rocket is poised to launch a new Progress cargo ship to the International Space Station tonight and you can watch it live here at the top of this page. 

The Progress 79 cargo ship will launch about 3 tons of supplies to the space station from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The ship will dock at the station on Friday, Oct. 29. 

You can watch the launch live above, or from our launch preview page here

2021-10-22T04:28:40.173Z
Progress 78 successfully docks at Nauka

The uncrewed Progress 78 cargo resupply ship has successfully docked with the Russian Multipurpose Laboratory module, or Nauka, nearly 29 hours after undocking from Russia’s Poisk module. The time of capture was 12:21 a.m. EDT (0421 GMT).

Contact and capture confirmed! The @roscosmos Progress 78 cargo craft redocked to station at 12:21am ET as Progress and the station flew 258 miles over the south Pacific. https://t.co/cBNqC5JGaz pic.twitter.com/XoQLUVRftxOctober 22, 2021

See more

2021-10-22T03:38:15.218Z
Watch Progress 78 dock with the space station

Russia’s Progress 78 cargo resupply spacecraft successfully undocked from the space station’s Poisk module late Wednesday (Oct. 20) and is currently scheduled to dock at the Nauka module at 12:24 a.m. EDT (0424 GMT) on Friday (Oct. 22). You can watch a live webcast of the docking in the window above. 

Read the full story: Russian cargo ship moves to new parking spot at space station

2021-10-17T05:21:28.480Z
That’s a wrap!

Russian actress Yulia Peresild and producer Klim Shipenko landed with cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy Sunday (Oct. 17) at 12:35 a.m. EDT (0435 GMT or 10:35 a.m. local time) on the steppe of Kazakhstan. Read the full story

2021-10-17T01:23:04.065Z
Soyuz undocking complete

(Image credit: NASA TV)

Cosmonaut Oleg Novitsky, actor Yulia Peresild and director Klim Shipenko are on their way back to Earth after undocking from the International Space Station in their Soyuz spacecraft.

NASA TV’s live coverage of the deorbit burn and landing will resume tonight (Oct. 16) at 11:15 p.m. EDT (0315 GMT); the landing in Kazakhstan is scheduled for approximately 12:36 a.m. (0436 GMT; 10:36 a.m. Kazakhstan time) on Sunday, Oct. 17.

2021-10-16T11:00:16.768Z
It’s landing day!

The 10 people living and working on the International Space Station share dinner in a photograph shared by cosmonaut Oleg Novitsky on Oct. 14, 2021. (Image credit: Roscosmos/NASA)

It’s landing day! Cosmonaut Oleg Novitsky, who is wrapping up a six-month stay in space, and a Russian actor Yulia Peresild and director Klim Shipenko, who have spent less than two weeks in orbit, are headed back to Earth.

If you’re thinking of tuning in, check out our full guide to today’s landing webcasts.

The trio will say their goodbyes at about 4:15 p.m. EDT (2015 GMT) before climbing into the Soyuz MS-18 capsule, which will undock from Russia’s Nauka module of the International Space Station on Saturday (Oct. 16) at 9:14 p.m. EDT (0114 GMT on Oct. 17) for the trip home.

The capsule, slowed by parachutes, will land in Kazakhstan on Sunday (Oct. 17) at 12:36 a.m. EDT (0436 GMT; 10:36 a.m. local time).

NASA TV and Space.com will offer live coverage of all three milestones, so stay tuned!

2021-10-08T20:33:50.171Z
Megan McArthur shares stunning Earth timelapse

Lightning storms, auroras and city lights glow across planet Earth in this gorgeous new timelapse video captured by NASA astronaut Megan McArther at the International Space Station. 

“Friday Night Lightning!” McArthur tweeted. “Checkout this time lapse taken over Africa from our cupola. In addition to thunderstorms, you can see city lights, the Milky Way, satellites, and even a bit of aurora at the end.” 

2021-10-05T15:32:56.256Z
Russian film crew boards space station

Russian actress Yulia Peresild and producer-director Klim Shipenko have entered the International Space Station with their cosmonaut guide Anton Shkaplerov to begin their 12-day movie shoot in orbit.

The trio entered the station’s Rassvet module at about 11 a.m. EDT (1500 GMT), jus about 6 hours after launching into orbit on their Soyuz rocket. They joined seven other crewmembers already aboard the station, including Expedition 65 cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy, who will appear in the film Peresild and Shipenko are shooting. It’s called “The Challenge,” with Peresild portraying a surgeon sent into orbit to help a cosmonaut (Novitskiy) in medical distress. 

“I still feel that it’s all a dream and I’m still asleep,” Peresild, 37, told Russia’s Channel One during a welcome ceremony on the station. 

Shipenko agreed. 

“Yes, it’s almost impossible to think that this all came to reality,” the 38-year-old director said.

During the welcome ceremony, Peresild received a congratulatory call from Valentina Tereshkova, who became the first woman in space in 1963 on the Vostok 6 mission. 

“It was extremely emotional for everyone, from sadness to happiness,” Tereshkova said of the launch in Russian, which was translated on NASA TV. “We’re very proud of you,” she added, saying she had only one wish for the crew.

“Everything should go nominal, that’s our best wish,” Tereshkova said. “We want all your dreams to come true and we’ll be waiting for you back here on Earth.”

2021-10-05T14:47:58.778Z
Hatch Opening Underway

Astronauts on the International Space Station are now working to open the hatches between the station and the Soyuz MS-19 spacecraft, allowing the Russian film crew to enter the orbiting lab.

2021-10-05T13:50:19.433Z
Space station hatch opening delayed

Russian mission control officials have told the station and Soyuz crews that hatch opening will occur in about an hour, a bit later than planned.

We’re awaiting a new hatch opening target time from NASA.

2021-10-05T13:36:25.346Z
Russian film crew to enter space station

The Russian film crew that launched to the International Space Station today on a Soyuz spacecraft is preparing to enter the orbiting laboratory for the first time. Hatches between the space station and their Soyuz MS-19 are due to be opened at 10:05 a.m. EDT (1405 GMT). 

You can watch the hatch opening and a welcome ceremony live in the NASA TV video feed at the top of this page.

2021-10-05T13:08:24.391Z
Amazing views of Soyuz docking with Russian film crew

Today’s successful docking of a Russian film crew at the International Space Station had some star quality of its own. As the Soyuz MS-19 spacecraft carrying Russian actress Yulia Peresild, director Klim Shipenko and cosmonaut Anton Shklaperov neared the station, a camera on the orbiting lab captured spectacular views of the approaching spacecraft. 

Check out the views in the video above!

2021-10-05T12:44:48.233Z
Docking! Soyuz delivers Russian film crew to space station

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The Soyuz MS-19 spacecraft carrying Russian actress Yulia Peresild, producer-director Klim Shipenko and cosmonaut Anton Shklaperov approaches the International Space Station on Oct. 5, 2021 in this still from station cameras captured during docking operations. (Image credit: NASA TV)

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The Soyuz MS-19 spacecraft carrying Russian actress Yulia Peresild, producer-director Klim Shipenko and cosmonaut Anton Shklaperov approaches the International Space Station on Oct. 5, 2021 in this still from station cameras captured during docking operations. (Image credit: NASA TV)

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The Soyuz MS-19 spacecraft carrying Russian actress Yulia Peresild, producer-director Klim Shipenko and cosmonaut Anton Shklaperov approaches the International Space Station on Oct. 5, 2021 in this still from station cameras captured during docking operations. (Image credit: NASA TV)

The Soyuz MS-19 spacecraft carrying a Russian actress and her producer/director has successfully docked at the International Space Station. It linked up with a port on the station’s Rassvet module at 8:22 a.m. EDT (1222 GMT), about 10 minutes later than planned after communications issues forced cosmonaut Anton Shklaperov to take manual control of the Soyuz for the docking. 

Despite the communications issue, Shklaperov docked the Soyuz at its port to deliver Russian actress Yulia Peresild and producer-director Klim Shipenko to the station. The duo will film scenes for an upcoming space film called “The Challenge,” with Peresild portraying a surgeon launched into space to help an ailing cosmonaut, to be portrayed by cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy, who is already aboard the space station.

“So the Soyuz MS-19’s safely at port, and a Russian actress and her producer-director are on set at the International Space Station for 12 days of movie making,” NASA spokesperson Rob Navias said during live commentary.

Peresild, Shipenko and Shklaperov will enter the space station at 10:05 a.m. EDT (1405 GMT) when the hatches are due to open between the Soyuz and station. NASA’s live coverage will resume at 9:30 a.m. EDT (1330 GMT). 

2021-10-05T11:38:58.895Z
Live docking coverage has begun

NASA’s webcast for today’s Soyuz docking at the International Space Station has begun. The Soyuz MS-19 spacecraft will dock its Russian film crew and cosmonaut commander at the station at 8:12 a.m. EDT (1212 GMT).

2021-10-05T09:19:21.863Z
Soyuz reaches orbit with Russian film crew

A view of Earth from Russia’s Soyuz MS-18 spacecraft after it reached orbit with a film crew on a mission to the International Space Station on Oct. 5, 2021. (Image credit: NASA TV)

Spacecraft separation! The Soyuz spacecraft carrying cosmonaut Anton Shklaperov, actress Yulia Peresild and director Klim Shipenko has successfully reached orbit after separating from its third stage and deploying solar arrays. 

‘We’re feeling great, everything’s working nominally’ Soyuz commander Shklaperov reports.

The three space travelers are on a two-orbit trip to the International Space Station and will arrive at 8:12 a.m. EDT (1212 GMT). NASA’s docking coverage will begin at 7:30 a.m. EDT (1130 GMT). You can watch that in the window at the top of this page at start time.

2021-10-05T08:55:40.471Z
LIFTOFF! Russian film crew launches to space station

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(Image credit: NASA TV)

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(Image credit: NASA TV)

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(Image credit: NASA TV)

Liftoff! The Soyuz rocket carrying a Russian film crew to the International Space Station lifted off on time at 4:55 a.m. EDT (0855 GMT). 

2021-10-05T08:42:30.093Z
Russian film crew before launch

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(Image credit: NASA TV)

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The zero-g indicators for the launch. (Image credit: NASA TV)

Here are a few views of the Soyuz MS-18 crew taken in the hours before launch. NASA TV is showcasing their pre-flight activities with a series of video clips as we near the T-10 minute mark for launch. 

2021-10-04T22:54:18.713Z
Russia launching film crew to International Space Station

Actor Yulia Peresild (left), cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov (center) and director Klim Shipenko (right) are scheduled to launch toward the International Space Station on Oct. 5, 2021. (Image credit: Roscosmos via Twitter)

Russia is counting down to launching the world’s first film crew to the International Space Station on a Soyuz spacecraft. Liftoff is set for 4:55 a.m. EDT (0855 GMT) from Launch Site 31 at Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan. 

The Soyuz is carrying Russian actress Yulia Perselid and director Klim Shipenko alongside veteran cosmonaut Anton Shklaperov. Perselid and Shipenko will spend 12 days in space filming scenes for a feature film called “The Challenge” while Shklaperov will begin a months-long stay on the space station. 

The trio are currently tucked inside their Soyuz spacecraft and rocket as they await launch. 

Source: space.com

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