Watch SpaceX’s 2nd attempt to launch 46 Starlink satellites from California on Friday

SpaceX will make a second attempt to launch 46 satellites on Friday (July 22), and you can watch the potentially record-breaking action live.

The two-stage Falcon 9 rocket, which induced a scrub at T-46 seconds on Thursday (July 21), is now slated to lift off from Vandenberg Space Force Base in California Friday. Liftoff is scheduled for 1:39 p.m. EDT (1739 GMT or 10:39 a.m. local time at the launch site) and you can watch here at Space.com or directly via SpaceX’s YouTube (opens in new tab) channel.

If SpaceX does send this Starlink group to orbit successfully, the company will surpass its 31 record launches of 2021 with a 32nd launch in 2022, and still counting. 

Related: Falcon 9: SpaceX’s workhorse rocket

The company generally turns on its broadcast about 15 minutes before launch time and runs it through the landing attempt of the Falcon 9’s first stage atop a droneship in the Pacific Ocean, in this case the ship named “Of Course I Still Love You.”

SpaceX most recently launched a set of Starlinks from Vandenberg on July 11. On that occasion, another set of 46 Starlink satellites made it to space and the rocket landed successfully upon the droneship.

SpaceX has launched far more Starlink batches from the U.S. East coast, most recently from Cape Canaveral Space Force Base in Florida on Sunday (July 17).

A Falcon 9 rocket carrying Starlink satellites blasted off on July 17, 2022. (Image credit: SpaceX)

Starlink has more than 2,800 individual Starlink satellites (opens in new tab) launched to orbit as the company seeks to build out its satellite-internet service. Group 3-2, should it launch successfully, will be SpaceX’s fourth Starlink launch in July alone.

SpaceX aims to build out the constellation quickly. It has regulatory approval to send 12,000 Starlink craft to orbit. The company is also asking an international regulator to approve 30,000 satellites after that.

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Source: space.com

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